How to Write a Political Bio

by Dr. Kelly S. Meier
A woman sits at an outdoor table with her laptop and writes with a pen in a notebook.

A woman sits at an outdoor table with her laptop and writes with a pen in a notebook.

A political biography sets the tone for who you are as a candidate and a person. It establishes an image that conveys your values, qualifications and passion for the position. Don’t hold back as you write a story that compels voters to choose you in the next election. Consider a political biography an opportunity to establish an image that has a lasting impact.

Crafting Your Story

Begin by taking inventory of your personal and professional experiences. Write down key information such as your age, family, education, job titles, community service activities, civic engagement, awards and the public service offices you’ve held. Write a separate list of qualities that separate you from the other candidates running for office.

Collect photographs, memorabilia and videos that can serve as supporting documentation for your skills and experiences. If possible, take some new pictures that reinforce your commitment to the district you wish to serve. Remember that potential voters are drawn to candidates that are charismatic and accessible. Photographs and videos can fortify the words used to describe you.

Use the information you’ve collected to write your story. Be clear and concise with your words and remember that most voters will not know who you are. Begin with background information that defines who you are as a person. Next, describe your skills and experiences that make a case for why you're best suited for the position. Finish with a statement of purpose or rationale for running. For print materials, intermingle photos that back up your biography. For a website, intermix photographs and video to bring your words to life.

Items you will need

  • Computer
  • Pen
  • Paper

About the Author

Dr. Kelly S. Meier is a professor and college administrator for a large public institution in Minnesota. She received her undergraduate degree from Western Illinois University and her master's degree and doctorate from Minnesota State University, Mankato. She has published more than 15 books on education, group development and diversity.

Photo Credits

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