How to Write a Letter of Interest for a Fraternity

by Jennifer Reid
Most fraternities require applicants to write a letter of interest to express what they could add to the group.

Most fraternities require applicants to write a letter of interest to express what they could add to the group.

When entering college, you certainly expect to encounter a few written assignments. What you perhaps didn't foresee is one of those assignments being a written letter of interest for the fraternity you desire to join. While seemingly pointless and possibly archaic, writing a letter of interest to your chosen fraternity could be the make it or break it factor in your acceptance to the organization.

Introduce yourself to the fraternity. Cite any hobbies, interests, or special talents you have and highlight anything that makes you stand out from the rest. If your family has a beach house in the Hamptons, now is the time to highlight that plus.

Prove you've done your research. It's common for college students to want to join a fraternity, but it's your job to show them why this fraternity is the one you want to join. Look at the fraternity's mission statement, philanthropy projects, and their reputation on campus. Let them know you've done your research and where you fit-in.

Reassure the fraternity of your academic prowess. Many college campuses have a minimum GPA required of their campus affiliated fraternal organizations. Your future brothers need to be reassured that you will raise, not lower that average. Cite your academic performance in high school and your academic ambitions for college.

Remind the fraternity of any connections you may have. If any relatives were members, let the fraternity know. Even slight connections are worth the effort; name dropping can never hurt. In addition, you should request a letter of support from these individuals. A letter of support is like a recommendation letter in which the fraternity alum gives you their stamp of approval.

Tip

  • Don't limit yourself to applying to one fraternity. Just like the college application process, it is best to increase your chances of being accepted, by applying to several.

About the Author

Jennifer Reid has been writing since 1998, including articles for "The Winchester Star," academic and creative writing journals such as "Fete" and "E" and eHow articles. She is also a high school teacher, educating students in the arts of writing, reading, and publications. She graduated from The College William and Mary with a Bachelor of Arts in English and secondary education.

Photo Credits

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