How to Word Thank You Cards

by Sumei FitzGerald

You can't go wrong sending a handwritten thank-you note. Emails take little time or thought, and store-bought cards can be too general and impersonal. A handwritten thank-you card is a personal form of acknowledgment and connection, according to Mary Mitchell, author of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Business Etiquette" and "Class Acts." Leslie Harpold of "The Morning News" agrees that there is no more sincere expression of gratitude than the time you take in wording your own thank-you note.

Hand-write thank-you cards.

Greet the giver, advises Harpold. In our foreshortened communications today, many of us may have become accustomed to leaving off greetings and names.

A personal note reaches out and touches someone.

Express your gratitude for the gift. Thank the person and mention the specific gift, except when it involves money. Harpold recommends thanking someone for their kindness or generosity when money is the subject of your thank-you.

Acknowlege the person's thoughtfulness.

Acknowledge the effort, expense and energy the person put into your gift. Perhaps they considered your favorite color or found out what you most needed at the time.

Let your aunt know the slippers are perfectly toasty.

Talk about how you use or have used the gift specifically. Share an anecdote from your life concerning your use of the gift that expresses your gratitude in a concrete way.

Allude to your relationship and connection.

Acknowledge how the person fits into your life, recommends Harpold. You might allude to the occasion for the gift or a meeting that will happen in the future.

Say thanks again before signing your letter.

Finish your thank-you note with a final thank-you and sign your name.

Tips

  • Hand-write your thank-you cards even if you have poor handwriting.
  • Don't diffuse your gratitude with gossip, news or other information.

Items you will need

  • Note-size stationary
  • Pen
  • Postage

About the Author

Sumei FitzGerald has been writing professionally since 2008 on health, nutrition, medicine and science topics. She has published work on doctors' websites such as Colon Cancer Resource, psychology sites such as Webpsykologen and environmental websites such as Supergreenme. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from the University of Connecticut where she also studied life sciences.

Photo Credits

  • silver thank you image by Brett Mulcahy from Fotolia.com