How to Throw a 75th Birthday Party

by Megan Mattingly-Arthur

By the time your grandparent or elderly friend reaches her 75th birthday she will have been to quite a few birthday parties in her time. Do something special to go beyond just the traditional cake and ice cream birthday party to throw a life celebration bash with friends and family.

Start by making the guest list. Make sure that you invite a good mix of both family and friends. If you're not sure who to invite, ask around. If you're throwing the party for a grandparent, another family member or friend of the birthday girl should be able to look over your guest list with you to make sure you haven't overlooked inviting anyone.

Send out your invites and ask guests to R.S.V.P. When they respond, ask guests if they have any pictures of the birthday girl to include in a "life collage." Get the whole family involved in finding pictures to make this a really special surprise complete with baby photos, wedding photos and other snapshots of important life events.

Find some CDs with popular tunes from the birthday girl's youth to play during the party. Ask around to try to find out if there are any songs in particular that have sentimental value and be sure to include them.

Do a little research to make some awesome visual aids for the party. Decorate some poster board and make a list of all the U.S. presidents that have held office during her lifetime. On another poster board make a list of important historical and cultural events. On a third poster board, make a list of important things that have been invented during the birthday girl's lifetime. For instance, my grandfather remembers when the microwave, among other things, was invented.

Use the party as a photo opportunity. Since you've got the family together anyway, use this opportunity to take some great generation photos of all of you together.

Items you will need

  • Birthday invitations
  • Family photos and snapshots
  • Poster board
  • Music
  • Cake
  • Decorations
  • Camera

About the Author

Megan Mattingly-Arthur has been writing professionally since 1998. She has contributed to various publications, including "Teen Voices" and "Positive Teens" magazines, as well as a book, "The Young Writer's Guide to Getting Published." Mattingly-Arthur is studying travel and tourism through Penn Foster Career School.

Photo Credits

  • Megan Mattingly-Arthur