Thank-You Note Ideas

by Stephanie T. Scott

Sending out thank-you notes isn't just about following etiquette. Thank-you notes show the gift givers that you appreciate their generosity and thoughtfulness. The notes should be personal, not generic. Send out thank-you notes within one to two weeks after receiving the gifts. If time beyond this has passed, send the thank-you note with a brief apology about not sending it sooner. A late thank-you note is better than no thank-you note.

Baby Shower Thank-You Notes

Print out a photo of the ultrasound on thick tagboard paper. Paste it to a thin magnet and place the magnet inside the thank-you card as a keepsake for the gift giver. Friends and family will be able to hang it up at home, work or school to proudly show it to everyone. Find a baby photo of you and your partner or spouse and make copies. Paste them side by side on the front of a blank thank-you card. Inside the card, write the thank-you note. Include a humorous comment about whose ears you think the baby should have, whose chin you hope the baby doesn't have or another funny quip to entertain the receiver of the thank-you card.

Wedding and Shower Thank-You Notes

Keep several pieces of the wrapping paper from each gift. Take a blank card and cut and paste the pieces to the front of the card like a collage or other creative design, such as a heart, flower or other inspiring shape. You can include other design elements on the card from the original wrapping such as ribbons, stickers and bows. Write the thank-you note on the inside and send it in the mail. Try to take a photo of each guest at the wedding, shower or engagement party with you or your spouse or other family and friends. Paste the photo to the front of a blank thank-you card. Inside, write the thank-you note as well as a brief anecdote or memory of you and that guest.

Kid Thank-You Notes

Send relatives and friends a memento of their generosity for a child's birthday or holiday gift. Take a photograph of the child with his gift. Print the photo on thick tagboard paper to make a postcard. On the backside, have the child write a brief thank-you note, or write it with the child if he is too young to write the words. Address the postcard, put a stamp on it and send it in the mail. The postcard provides space for a quick note that is just long enough for a child to write the thank you without being overwhelmed. For younger children who can write but have a limited vocabulary, write the thank-you note for them. Instead of writing every word, choose to leave blanks in place for the child to write the word in his or her own handwriting. For example, you could write, "Thank you ___ for the ______. It is really ______." The child can fill it in with words of his or her choice, such as, "Thank you Grandpa for the dinosaur. It is really cool."

About the Author

Stephanie T. Scott is a middle school English teacher in Phoenix. She holds a B.A. in journalism from Grand Valley State University and an M.Ed. in educational media and technology from Eastern Michigan University. Scott is also working on her Ed.D. in organizational leadership at Grand Canyon University.

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