Sunday School Games for 8- to 10-Year-Olds

by Trudie Longren
Eight- to 10-year-old Sunday school students enjoy competing over Bible knowledge.

Eight- to 10-year-old Sunday school students enjoy competing over Bible knowledge.

Eight- to 10-year-old Sunday school students learn about the lives of Bible characters, memorize Bible verses and know the books of the Bible. One way to engage these young learners is to devise games to play during class. Use the games to introduce a subject, check for understanding or review a series of lessons.

Bible Checkers

Give the game of checkers a twist. Make up questions related to the Sunday school lesson. Bring in checkerboards and pair up the students. Students may advance their chips on the checkerboard only if they correctly answer questions.

Bible Tic-Tac-Toe

Tic-tac-toe is a good way to begin a lesson by asking questions about the Sunday school lesson the week before. Make a list of questions based on the previous lesson. Divide the class into two teams and let one team be "X" and one team be "O." Put a tic-tac-toe matrix on the board or on a large piece of paper. Pose a question to one team; if it correctly answers, let the team choose where to put the "X" or "O." When a team incorrectly answers, move the question to the other team and let it have a chance to answer. When one team has three "X"s or "O"s in a row, that team wins the game.

Fill in the Blank

Write important words from a Bible verse on pieces of paper. Give students different words. After teaching the Bible verse, write out the Bible verse, leaving spaces for the words you have on the pieces of paper. Ask students to find out where their words belong in the verse, then tape the words up.

Who Am I?

"Who am I" is a review game to use at the end of a unit. The game is played by giving clues regarding a Bible character who was studied. Begin with obscure details and progress to descriptions that are easier to guess until a student (or a team) correctly guesses the Bible personality.

About the Author

Trudie Longren began writing in 2008 for legal publications, including the "American Journal of Criminal Law." She has served as a classroom teacher and legal writing professor. Longren holds a bachelor's degree in international politics, a Juris Doctor and an LL.M. in human rights. She also speaks Spanish and French.

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