How to Request Removal From Junk Mail Lists

by Jordan Whitehouse

Not only can junk mail be annoying to receive, but if it's in paper form, it can be harmful to the environment. Although most paper junk mail can be recycled, not everyone recycles -- and even if you do recycle, millions of trees are still cut down to satisfy the junk mail needs of companies. If you'd like to stop receiving junk mail, you'll have to make a formal request to the company who sends you the mail or to an association who protects consumers.

Open the piece of junk email that you would like to stop receiving. Look to the bottom of the email for a link that says something like "Unsubscribe" or "Stop Receiving These Messages." Click on that link and follow the prompts to remove your name from the company's email list.

Navigate to the Direct Marketing Association's website and register for the email “Preference Service and the Mail Preference Service.” Once you register and select your mail and email preferences, DMA will contact the companies affiliated with DMA to remove your name from the mailing lists you selected (see Resources).

Call the customer service department of the companies from whom you would like to stop receiving junk mail. There should be a phone number displayed on the piece of junk mail itself, but if there isn't, navigate to the company's website to find it.

Fill out the opt-out request on OptOutPrescreen’s website. This service stops credit bureaus from selling your information to other companies who may send you junk mail.

Tear off the mailing label attached to the piece of junk mail. Mail the label with a request for removal from the company's mailing list. Not all companies associate with DMA, so you could still receive junk mail from companies even after you've registered with DMA.

About the Author

Based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Jordan Whitehouse has been writing on food and drink, small business, and community development since 2004. His work has appeared in a wide range of online and print publications across Canada, including Atlantic Business Magazine, The Grid and Halifax Magazine. Whitehouse studied English literature and psychology at Queen's University, and book and magazine publishing at Centennial College.

Photo Credits

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