How to Present a Treasurer's Report at a Meeting

by Chris Waller
Income statements are an important part of monitoring your financial situation.

Income statements are an important part of monitoring your financial situation.

The treasurer of a company, organization or other group keeps track of the budget and spending of the group. If you have the treasurer's job, you are responsible for compiling and presenting a report at board meetings. There are a few items that you must include in this report, including a rundown of the expenses for the time period and the current holdings of the group.

Prepare a written version of the report before the meeting. This report should include four items: the balance at the beginning of the period, the income for the period, the expenses for the period and the balance at the end of the period. Print out a copy for each member who will be in attendance plus a few extras, and hand out the copies before you begin your presentation.

State the balance of all of the accounts that your group or company owned at the beginning of the period since your last meeting. This number should be a dollar total of all accounts. Don't include cents to make the number easy to visualize and remember. This will offer a good starting point for the rest of the report.

State the income, or the money that you took in for the period. If you work in an organization where the income is the same or similar every month, you do not need to go into depth about this. If you have a large source of income that is not typical, you'll need to explain where this money came from.

Explain the expenses that your group had for the time period. Much like the incoming funds, outgoing funds do not need to be explained in depth if they are reoccurring expenses that the board knows about -- for example, utility bills or the salaries of workers. If there is a large expense that is unusual, be sure to explain what the expense was and why it was necessary.

State the balance of all of the accounts, including cash on hand and investments, as your conclusion. This figure is what board members will use as a basis for decisions about spending during the meeting. Before finishing, ask if anyone needs any clarification.

About the Author

Chris Waller began writing in 2004. Chris has written for the "Fulton Sun" and eHow, focusing on technology and sports. Chris has won multiple awards for his writing including a second place award in the Missouri Press Association's Better Newspaper Contest. Chris earned Bachelor of Arts degrees in journalism and English from Truman State University.

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