How to Organize a Community Event

by Thea Theresa English
Local neighborhoods benefit greatly from community events

Local neighborhoods benefit greatly from community events

Community events serve a variety of purposes. Some events are used to raise funds for a need while other community events are designed to inform or entertain city residents. For example, a local university may plan a health fair so residents can come and receive free screenings from doctors as well as advice on how they can prevent certain illnesses. Community events are often held at public parks, banquet halls, schools or civic centers.

Decide on the goals of the event. If you're concerned that not enough low-income families in your neighborhood have access to nutritional and affordable foods, then organize a fundraiser where you can use the funds to give to various local food banks or soup kitchens. Or if you want to inform residents on new laws that could affect homeowners in a negative way, hold a seminar for this purpose.

Contact businesses for donations. If you're planning a fall food festival, contact various restaurants and ask if they would like to donate some food to your event. Or, if you're organizing a furniture sale for fundraising purposes, visit different furniture stores and seek out donations of items from them.

Invite speakers to the event. If you want to hold a seminar that will help local job seekers have an effective job search, contact local career experts and discuss the nature of your seminar. Then ask if they would like to speak to the seminar's attendants. Also, offer invitations to university career services directors and owners of successful businesses in your city.

Get input from people in your neighborhood. If you're interested in holding monthly clothing giveaways for senior citizens on a fixed income, hold a meeting with the neighbors and let them offer suggestions on how you can make these events successful.

Promote the event. Take flyers to local churches, hospitals, beauty salons, schools, and community centers. Hold interviews on local radio and public access TV stations describing the nature of the event and when and where it will be held. Tell friends and relatives about the event so they can spread the word to others.

About the Author

Thea Theresa English is a freelance writer who lives in New Orleans. She has written articles on career development, maintaining healthy relationships, politics and cultural issues. She is currently a graduate student at Tulane University where she will receive her Master of Liberal Arts degree.

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