How Many Pyramids Are There?

by Jason Chavis

It is unknown exactly how many pyramids exist throughout the world. A number of different civilizations have constructed pyramids as temples, monuments or burial sites for many years. While the most famous of these pyramids are found in Egypt, other areas also feature similar designs. New pyramids are unearthed every few years, most notably in the Mesoamerica region.

Egyptian

As of 2009, there are a total of 110 known pyramids throughout Egypt. These pyramids were built for kings and queens of the ancient empire. Many of these pyramids have disintegrated into a shell of their former structure.

Greek and Roman

Although very different from the pyramids built in Egypt, two examples of Greek architecture survive to this day. One is located at Hellenikon, while the other is near Ligourio. Rome built the Pyramid of Cestius in the first century BC near Porta San Paolo.

Asian

Throughout Asia, a number of pyramids have been built for burial and religious reasons. In India, three large pyramid temples were built during the Chola Empire. In China, a dozen flat-topped mound pyramids were constructed for various emperors since 221 BC.

Mesoamerican

Hundreds of pyramids have been unearthed throughout Mexico and Central America. This includes the largest monument ever constructed, the Great Pyramid of Cholula in Puebla. The Pyramid of the Sun, also in Mexico, is the third largest. More pyramids are unearthed from lava and the ground every few years.

Other Pyramids

A number of other pyramids have been built across the planet. Most of these examples of pyramid technology are relegated to lone structures. Examples include the pyramid in Falicon, France, and Monk's Mound in Illinois.

Resources

About the Author

Jason Chavis has been a professional freelance writer since 1998. He is the author of four books, two movies and a play as well as numerous articles for "Scientific American," The History Channel, City Pages and "The Onion." In 1996, Chavis won the award for "best science fiction/fantasy" from the River Valley Writer’s Conference.

Photo Credits

  • Wufei07; Public Domain; Wikimedia Commons