How to Make Bows for Greek Christening Candles

by Alana Armstrong
Turn ribbon into a pretty bow to adorn Greek christening candles.

Turn ribbon into a pretty bow to adorn Greek christening candles.

Greek baptismal candles are typically kept after the ceremony by the family of the person being baptized. The candles are then used to celebrate religious occasions and landmarks throughout their life. They may be brought to church and lit on feast days, at midnight Easter liturgy and even on their wedding day. The decorative candle is a reminder for the Christian to live and die by the light of Christ.

Cut a seven inch piece of ribbon.

Use a lighter to heat seal the two ends of the ribbon. This will prevent the ribbon from fraying over time. To accomplish this, wave a lit match or lighter close to the cut edge of the ribbon until it melts slightly.

Pinch a one inch loop of ribbon between your thumb and forefinger and wrap the next section of ribbon once around the loop and your pinched fingers. Push the next section of the ribbon through the hole to create the second loop of the bow. Tighten the bow by pulling the two loops taught.

Add a tiny silk rosette or several of them by hot gluing one to three of them to the center of the bow.

Cut a circular piece of tulle and glue the back of the bow to the center of it. This will create a halo effect around the bow.

Items you will need

  • 7/8 inch ribbon
  • Scissors
  • Lighter (optional)
  • Rosettes/tulle (optional)
  • Glue gun

Tips

  • Practice heat sealing scrap pieces of ribbon if you're just learning how to do it.
  • When the bows are finished, attach them to the candles with a dot of hot glue.
  • For an extra long tail on the bow, use a piece of ribbon that is at least 12 inches long.
  • For every pillar candle larger than three inches in diameter, use a ribbon with a one inch width and tie the bows using the instructions above.

About the Author

Alana Armstrong started her writing career in 2005, covering street art and graffiti. She currently works as a freelance writer, photographer and artist in Toronto. Armstrong has a diploma in photojournalism from Sheridan College and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in photo media from the University of New South Wales.

Photo Credits

  • Maria Teijeiro/Photodisc/Getty Images