How to Learn to Write Hebrew

by Culture & Society Editor
With the availability of free online language classes students can forgo the cost of textbooks and learn Hebrew from their homes

With the availability of free online language classes students can forgo the cost of textbooks and learn Hebrew from their homes

Learning to write Hebrew is a difficult academic process that takes time and dedication. Hebrew is an ancient language that was used to record some of humanity's earliest religious and philosophical ideas. Because written Hebrew is very different than spoken Hebrew, the student learning to write Hebrew should pay attention to a few important steps.

Learn the Hebrew alphabet. While this might seem like an obvious step, its importance in Hebrew cannot be overstated. The Hebrew alphabet contains many numerical and philosophical meanings in addition to important ties to the Old Testament. A good education on the Hebrew alphabet will help the larger process of learning to write Hebrew.

Find a good Hebrew language learning book to start learning. Many people learn written Hebrew without ever speaking a word of it. A good text and some dedication is an excellent way to begin learning to write Hebrew.

Start a word log. Like playing the piano or riding a bike, it's practice that counts. Unlike Western languages, Hebrew is written from right to left and involves an unfamiliar script. Practice writing new words and letters in a notebook. Monitor your progress by noting how closely your writing resembles the writing in your Hebrew book.

Read as much as possible. Children's books are a great way to start. Because many of the plots and themes are familiar, kids' books are an effective way to expand the vocabulary and become familiar with Hebrew sentence structure. Move on to online newspapers like Haaretz.com and eventually to shorter adult books.

Study with a professional teacher. If you want to write Hebrew like a professional, you will probably have to study with one. Find a Hebrew tutor by placing an ad on a website like Craigslist or enroll in a Hebrew writing course at a college or language school.

Photo Credits

  • hebrew letters and prayer books image by leprechaun from Fotolia.com