How to Put a Military Belt On

by Brenda Priddy

Most branches of the military have the two same styles of belts for the battle uniform and the dress uniform. The colors of the belts will vary by service, but the method of wearing the belt is the same from service to service. The idea is to wear a belt that looks professional, neat and pulled together. For the most part, the male and female uniforms wear their belts in the same manner. However, the positioning of the belt buckle can vary between the male and female uniforms.

Battle Dress Belt

Fit the belt through the belt loops. The belt buckle edge should align with the edge of the BDU shirt, typically on the left side of the shirt.

Bring the belt through the belt buckle up through the first slot and down through the second slot. Adjust the fit so that the belt is snug around the waist.

Position the belt buckle so that it aligns with the button of the pants. Pull the webbed belt through the first belt loop to help it lay flat. If the belt extends beyond this first loop, then trim it with scissors so that it extends no farther than the first belt loop. Heat the edges of the belt with a cigarette lighter to burn off any loose ends and seal the edge of the belt.

Dress Uniform Belt

Put on the dress uniform pants. Align the belt buckle with the buttons on the dress shirt. For males this should be the left side and for females, the right.

Slide the belt through the belt loops. Position the belt buckle so that the edge of the buckle that the belt aligns with is the edge of the buttoned shirt. Push the belt through the buckle. Pull the belt back slightly, so that the shiny metal part of the belt is exposed but all fabric is hidden.

Trim the belt, if necessary, by removing the buckle and trimming the belt from that side of the belt with sharp scissors. Reattach the buckle and wear the belt as normal.

Items you will need

  • Scissors
  • Cigarette lighter

About the Author

Brenda Priddy has more than 10 years of crafting and design experience, as well as more than six years of professional writing experience. Her work appears in online publications such as Donna Rae at Home, Five Minutes for Going Green and Daily Mayo. Priddy also writes for Archstone Business Solutions and holds an Associate of Arts in English from McLennan Community College.

Photo Credits

  • Siri Stafford/Lifesize/Getty Images