Government Programs for Troubled Teens

by Jennifer Moore

Many state teen programs are either totally or partially funded by the federal government, with those partially funded supplemented by private donations. There are different types of programs, like those that help troubled teens set positive goals. These work at preventing teen issues before they occur. Other federal teen programs work with teens who have already had legal issues and need to reintegrate with society.

After-School Programs

The federal government works with community programs to prevent troubled teen problems. Grants are provided for after-school programs that help teens learn conflict resolution and offer other constructive outlets for teens like sports, arts and crafts and other learning activities. After-school programs are implemented in many elementary, middle and high schools in high-risk neighborhoods throughout the nation. The objective is to help younger teens find interests and channel their energy there before they reach those troubled teen years.

Therapy

This type of therapy program is geared toward changing teen behavior, especially when it is the result of abuse. Government-funded therapy programs help the teen and the entire family to resolve the teen's negative behavior.

Mentoring

Currently there are many different types of teen mentoring programs. Some mentors are work- and career-oriented, while others focus on companionship and education. This type of program is funded by the federal government in many ways. Volunteers are made up of young adults, college students or even career-oriented individuals willing to share their point of view and life objectives with teens who come from economically depressed areas. The objective of this type of program is to give troubled teens positive reinforcement and help them attain positive life goals.

Society Re-entry Programs

According to the Office of Justice Department, approximately 650,000 people are released from state and federal prison every year, and many of those are under the age of 18. According to statistics from the Bureau of Justice, 50 percent of these people will have legal issues again within three years of being released from prison. Federal re-entry programs were developed to minimize this statistic and offer job training, placement, transitional housing and mentoring programs.

About the Author

Jennifer Moore began writing in 2006, specializing in Web content, blogs and forum postings. She is a graduate from the most prestigious university in Mexico, Universidad de Las Americas, with a B.A. in international relations, later obtaining a U.S. teacher's degree and an additional CompTIA A+ certification in computer technology. Moore has written for My Mexico Living, BoomersAbroad and various other websites.

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