Government Grants for Blackfeet Indians

by Gail Sessoms

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs lists the Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Montana as a federally acknowledged Native-American tribe. Federally acknowledged Native-American tribes are eligible to receive services, including grants, from the U.S. government. The Blackfeet is the largest Native-American tribe in Montana. The 1.5 million acre Blackfeet reservation spans seven towns and is home to 10,000 residents, most of whom are Blackfeet and their descendants. Another 6,500 Blackfeet are dispersed throughout the world. Many federal government grants that are available to local and state governments also are available to tribal governments, including the Blackfeet. Montana state grants are also available to Native-American communities.

WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants

The Denver office of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation describes the WaterSMART grants as "leveraged water sustainability grants" and intends the funds to support water reclamation projects. Activities may include improved use of resources and money, water conservation, renewable energy, endangered species protection and water-related crisis prevention. Tribal governments in Montana are eligible to apply for the grants. Applicants must register online with Grants.gov and complete an online application. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation U.S. Department of the Interior 1849 C Street NW Washington, DC 20240 303-445-2025 usbr.gov

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Projects for American Indians with Disabilities

The U.S. Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services provides this grant to support vocational rehabilitation services for disabled native-Americans who live on or near reservations. Supported activities include services that enable Native-Americans with disabilities to develop self-sufficiency and achieve full participation in the community. Funded programs assist with employment, business ownership and telecommuting. Eligible applicants are the governing bodies, or consortia, of Native-American tribes located on reservations. Applicants must register online with Grants.gov and complete an online application. U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Room 5088 Potomac Center Plaza Washington, DC 20202 202-245--7410 ed.gov

Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program

The U.S. Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides the Cooperative Agreements for Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families grant to support mental health programs for youth and their families. The grant supports collaborative programs that combine community-based mental health services with home-based services. Eligible applicants include Native-America tribes, tribal governments and tribal organizations. Grant applications are available on the SAMHSA website. Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health Services 1 Choke Cherry Road Rockville, MD 20857 240-276-1980 samhsa.gov

FOGRMA Cooperative Agreements With States and Tribes

The U.S. Minerals Management Service provides grants through the FOGRMA (Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management) Cooperative Agreement with States and Tribes. Federally recognized Native-American tribes are eligible to apply for grants to support audits and investigations of mineral-producing areas on tribal land. Applicants must register online with Grants.gov and complete an online application to apply. Minerals Revenue Management P.O. Box 25165 Denver, CO 80225 303-231-3936 mms.gov

Administration for Native Americans

The Administration for Native Americans (ANA), a program of the U.S. Administration for Children and Families, provides grants to Native-American communities to support a variety of community-based projects, including language preservation, social and economic development, environmental regulatory projects and governance development programs. The ANA promotes cultural preservation and self-sufficiency in Native-American communities. Administration for Native Americans Mail Stop: 2nd Fl. West Aerospace Center 370 L'Enfant Promenade SW Washington, D.C. 20447 877-922-9262 acf.hhs.gov

Tips

Montana, like all states, receives federal grants that are used to make sub-grants to local governments, including tribal governments. Montana state agencies provide information on their websites about grant availability. Many Montana state agencies have offices that focus on Native-American issues. An example is the Montana Office of Public Instruction's Indian Education for All initiative, which also provides grants.

About the Author

Gail Sessoms, a grant writer and nonprofit consultant, writes about nonprofit, small business and personal finance issues. She volunteers as a court-appointed child advocate, has a background in social services and writes about issues important to families. Sessoms holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies.

Photo Credits

  • Montana state contour with Capital City against blurred USA flag image by Stasys Eidiejus from Fotolia.com