How to Establish a New Address

by Stephanie Flood

Moving to a new home in the United States requires establishing your new address. That's essential if you want to ensure you receive old and new mail, receive financial aid or get in-state college tuition. You need to notify government agencies and financial institutions of your address change.

Change your mailing address online if you can. Go to USPS.gov. Click on the "Change of address" option. You will give the post office information like forwarding dates and old and new addresses.

Change your new address on your license at the Department of Motor Vehicles in your county. You will need to fill out a form with your new address information and you may need to pay a fee. Register your car–if you own a car and you're living in a new state.

Sign up for a bank account in your state or county to establish your new address. This means having information ready like correct identification including your driver's license or picture ID. You may need a minimum of money to open an account too. Keep all these financial documents in a safe area.

Change your voting registration address. You can usually fill out an official voter registration card online through the secretary of state or country registrar. This includes giving out information like contact information, date of birth and new address. Print it out and then sign, stamp and date it. Mail it to the appropriate agency.

Change all primary bills and certifications to your new address. You may not want to wait for those important bills to be forwarded or changed. Bills addressed to your new established place of living will also serve as proof or residency for getting a library card or for financial institutions. You might need to notify the Internal Revenue Service of your address change too.

Start employment at your new address. Make sure that your tax information and working status is solidified. Pay taxes and file tax returns at your mailing new address. Notify your past employer if you want last year's W-2 mailed to you as well.

Tip

  • Check in your local government for more steps you'll need to go through to establish your new address.

About the Author

Stephanie Flood began writing professionally in 2008. She has been published in local magazines including "Flagstaff Live" and "The Noise." Her work also appears on various websites. She earned a Bachelor of Science in journalism from Northern Arizona University. Flood's writing covers subjects including health, wellness, spirituality, travel, living and outdoors.

Photo Credits

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