How to Build Noah's Ark From a Cardboard Box

by Adam Benjamin

Building an ark for animal crackers takes three cardboard boxes. A child can spend a little time to make the building to house the animals. Once the Noah's Ark is made, a small Noah figure can lead the animal crackers into the Ark.

Trim the large flat piece. Use the scissors to remove the sides from the large shoebox cover.

Make the base with the large flat piece and make each long end a point by cutting the two corners. Set the piece on the table for the ark base.

Turn over the child's shoe box so the bottom makes a flat building top.

Make a door in the ark front. Cut the door's right side and top. Use the scissors to make a cut up 2 inches from the front bottom, starting 1 inch to the right of the front's center. Then, for the door top, cut a horizontal line in 2 inches to the left. Add a knob and latch by pushing the round headed paper fastener through the door, and bending the fasteners. Paste the building on the base. Let it dry.

Build the roof by cutting out two equal sided triangles from cardboard with medium thickness. Measure the top edge on the building front to know the triangle's base size. After both pieces are ready, paste one triangle on top of the building's front and back. Let dry. Take the two pieces of the shallow box and overlap two 10-inch sides. Paste together at the overlap. Slide the roof on top of the triangle supports, and secure with paste. The Ark is now ready for Noah and the animals.

Tip

  • A child can use the Ark inside, or outside.

Items you will need

  • Child's shoe box
  • Cover of a large shoe box
  • Shallow box, with a cover the same depth as the bottom —10 x 4 inches (1/4 to 1/3 inches deep)
  • Scissors
  • Paste or glue
  • Round headed paper fastener

About the Author

Adam Benjamin Pollack is a San Diego native dedicated to the great sentences on civil society. He authored the Subchapter S Report to tell legal news for the American Bankers Association. He holds a Juris Doctor from Indiana University and a Master of Public Policy from University of California, Berkeley.

Photo Credits

  • Adrián González de la Peña/Demand Media