Bible Games for Seventh Day Adventist

by Greyson Ferguson

Seventh Day Adventist is one of the many denominations of the Christian faith. The main difference between Seventh Day Adventists and other denominations is that Seventh Day Adventists observe Saturday as the Sabbath, instead of Sunday as do most other denominations. If you are running a vacation Bible school at the church, or if you are in the middle of children's church, you may want to come up with a few games that will not only help the children learn the Bible, but pass the time as well.

Matching

child at church

The matching game can be fun for the children to play. What you need to do is come up with different names from people in the Bible. Keep this list of names visible only to you. Split the group of children into two teams. Have one member of the team come up to you and pick a name from your list. Ask the two children if this individual was an apostle, king or prophet. Allow each child only one answer (they can both have the same answer). Once both children has given you their answers, tell them what the correct response is. Give one point for accorrect answer. The team with the most points when all the names are gone (or when time is up) wins.

Creation List

child writing at church

The creation story is an important aspect to the Christian faith, however it can sometimes be hard to remember in order, especially for younger children. Give each child a piece of paper and something to write with and see if each of them (by themselves) can write out each day of creation in order. You do not need to collect the papers because it wasn't a test. Simply ask the students what happened on the first day and have them call out their answers.

Jeopardy

children in line

Jeopardy is a allows you to ask your students questions from the Bible in a competitive format. Like the matching game, split the teams into two groups. Have one student from each team come up to you. Ask them a Bible question. The first child to answer the question correctly will earn a point for her team. Have the children go back to the group and have the next two children come up. Make sure each child stays in order so they will have the same number of opportunities to play. Like in matching, the team with the most points at the end of the allotted time wins.

References

About the Author

Greyson Ferguson is a graduate of the Savannah College of Art and Design with a degree in film and television. He currently resides in Lansing, Michigan where he works on independent film projects and writes for numerous publications. Ferguson primarily focuses on computer and electronic articles. Greyson produces TheDailyUpbeat.com, focusing on only upbeat news stories with daily updates.

Photo Credits

  • Stockbyte/Valueline/Getty Images