How to Address a CC on a Letter

by Sampson Quain

Business letters are written in formal language and are sent for a variety of reasons, including communication within a company, correspondence from one business to another, response to customer inquiries and complaints and for legal issues. Most business letters are written in block format, in which the left margin aligns all the way down the page. Some business letters also require you to include more than one recipient. To inform all recipients that they are receiving the same letter, use "CC" (carbon copy) at the end of your correspondence.

Write your business letter using full block format. Address your salutation to the main recipient of the letter and do not include the names of those who are receiving copies.

Write your closing using either "Sincerely yours" or "Yours truly." Skip four lines and write your name. Provide a signature between the closing and your name.

Skip two lines and type "cc" followed by a colon. Type the name of the person. For example, if you are carbon copying a man named John Smith, type "cc: John Smith." If there is more than one additional recipient, type each name on a separate line, ensuring that everything is left justified. In some instances, such as with legal business letters, you may have to include the person's address. Type it in this manner: "cc: John Smith 1234 Main Street Anytown, USA 55555"

Tip

  • Use "bcc" (blind carbon copy) only on your copy of the letter if you do not want the main recipient of your letter to know you are sending copies to other people.

About the Author

Sampson Quain is a screenwriter and filmmaker who began writing in 1996. He has sold feature and television scripts to a variety of studios and networks including Columbia, HBO, NBC, Paramount and Lionsgate. He holds a Master of Fine Arts in screenwriting from the University of Southern California.

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